Deborah Kerr
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mydeborahkerr:

The Grass Is Greener (1960)

mydeborahkerr:

The Americans and Deborah’s name

"Deborah Kerr’s name is pronounced with the accent on the Deb and the last name coming out as Carr. Since the only freedom left in the world is the way a man pronounces his name, we may as well pamper Miss Kerr in this regard and practice until we have it right. The Scotch are a sensitive people who have had little joy in life and the least their friends can do is call them by their right names. We have discussed this with Miss Kerr and wish to report this as the sense of the meeting.” (1940s press)

mydeborahkerr:

  “I loved David very much. Our relationship was one of total fun, because every disaster on the set or off was always met by David as some kind of elaborate joke played on him from above.
  He never let that mask slip in public, and it was only after years of working with him that I began to see a darker, sadder side to his nature. Most of the time we were like two children in school, crying with laughter over each other’s jokes; but there was a terrible insecurity about him when we got near the end of a picture. If he didn’t know exactly what film he was going into next, he got terribly neurotic about not being in work.
  He had to keep working, working, working all the time and I never in all the years I knew him found out why. Was he really so worried about money, or was it an escape from the family, or just that he liked the life of a film studio more than any other?
  He couldn’t bear life if he wasn’t actually working: a lot of actors are like that. David didn’t have any other life until he started to write again: at this time, the films were really everything.” (Deborah Kerr)

David Niven (March 1, 1910 - July 29, 1983)

mydeborahkerr:

The Viertels, on their wedding day - Klosters, 23.07.1960

mydeborahkerr:

The Viertels, on their wedding day - Klosters, 23.07.1960

   “The morning of her wedding day, Deborah was in a panic. Her wedding dress had not arrived. The ceremony was due at 11: 30. Peter’s young secretary, Ann Hutton, raced to the post office in her sports car. The dress was to have arrived air-mail special-delivery from the famed salon of Givenchy in Paris. But the postmaster shook his head, ‘No, there is no package for Miss Kerr.’
   Ann drove back to tell Deborah. ‘Maybe I’d better go with you,’ Deborah said. ‘He must have it there, somewhere.’ Ann zoomed to the village post office where the postmaster shrugged his shoulders. ‘No, Miss Kerr,’ he nodded, ‘there is no package for you. You can see for yourself.’
  Deborah quickly looked through the clutter of parcels waiting to be picked up by village residents. There was a blue denim wrapped trunk from the House of Givenchy. ‘This is it!’ she shouted with joy. ‘My wedding dress.’
  ‘But the label says it’s for Mr. Viertel,’ the postmaster pointed out. ‘I can’t let you have this without his written permission.’
  Again, Ann drove off. She found Peter who signed the postmaster’s release form.” (1960s press)

bathtubginjazz:

Deborah Kerr

mydeborahkerr:

King Solomon’s Mines (1950)

   “At Meru, we had a film shown to us one evening. It turned out to be my own Vacation from Marriage. When I came on-screen, the native porter who’d been assigned to me took one look at the screen, glanced at me and walked off. Later an interpreter told me he had said: ‘Can’t be. She up there. She here. Can’t be!’” (Deborah Kerr)

mydeborahkerr:

Peter Viertel, explaining his limited writing about Deborah in his memoirs, “Dangerous Friends”:

"It has long been my view that reminiscences are in order when they recall a part of the past that is over and done with, so that whatever indiscretions may result from looking back can do little harm to the people who have survived. When they touch upon the lives of those who share the author’s present, he is obliged to act as his own censor. We inflict enough pain on the human beings we love without revealing secrets that might cause them embarrassment. That is the reason for my brief preamble — an explanation for my limiting the account of the most important turning point in my life to a synopsis of events rather than a detailed narrative."